What is happening in the Central African Republic?

23 January 2014 – Violence continues, though it has died down somewhat in the capital Bangui. The ICRC and the Central African Red Cross Society are working hard in several areas of the country to come to the aid of the wounded, the sick, people forced to flee their homes and others affected by the fighting. On this map you can find the highlights of Red Cross action across the country. See Operational Update.

The photos used for this map were all taken in the Central African Republic, but not necessarily in the places indicated.

The boundaries and names shown, and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the International Committee of the Red Cross.

Content

  • Bangui

    The situation in the capital has returned almost to normal, apart from sporadic violence. The ICRC and the Central African Red Cross remain active in many parts of the city.

    Though there is a gradual return to normality in the capital, despite sporadic outbreaks of violence, the heavy presence of armed men on main streets in extreme northern and western Bangui continues to make the population vulnerable to attack.

     

    The huge numbers of people forced to flee their homes in Bangui and now assembled at various sites do not yet feel confident enough to return to their neighbourhoods.

     

    Main action

    The ICRC has:

    • been working with the Central African water board to supply over 210,000 litres of drinking water per day to the tens of thousands of people living at Bangui airport
    • been supplying 15,000 litres of drinking water a day to the Boy Rabe monastery, where 30,000 people have been taking refuge
    • distributed food to some 7,000 people taking refuge at the Carmel de Bimbo mission in southern Bangui, enough to cover their needs for a week
    • operated on 65 people at the Community Hospital
    • flown (last Saturday) 26 tonnes of medical supplies into Bangui.

    Elsewhere in the Central African Republic: Delegates have visited places of detention to assess the conditions. They carried out an emergency distribution of food to 45 detainees at Ngaragba jail.

  • Bossembele, Boyali and Boali

    In recent days, volunteers from the Central African Red Cross have buried over 60 bodies. For its part, the ICRC took 29 seriously injured people to hospital.

    In recent days, volunteers from the Central African Red Cross have buried over 60 bodies around Bossembele, Boyali and Boali, while the ICRC took 29 seriously injured people to hospital.

    Staff from the ICRC and the Central African Red Cross have been administering first aid to people with minor injuries and taken more serious cases to hospital. To facilitate the work of Red Cross volunteers, the ICRC has furnished them with first-aid equipment and body bags.

  • Vakaga area

    Hundreds of people from Bangui, among them armed men, continue to pour into the area.

    In the north of the country, hundreds of people from the capital, among them armed men, continue to pour into the area around Vakaga, near the border with Chad and Sudan. "This is a worrying development,” says Gabriel Mukalai, who heads the ICRC’s sub-delegation in Ndele, adding that the area had so far been spared the violence that had shaken Bangui and the rest of the country.

  • Ndele

    The ICRC has a sub-delegation in Ndele, where it is working to improve people’s access to drinking water.

     The ICRC’s main activity in Ndele involves providing drinking water to the town’s 10,000 inhabitants. This work includes the sinking of three new wells.

  • Kaga Bandoro

    The ICRC is a major provider of medical care in the area.

    So far in 2014, the ICRC’s five mobile clinics in the central part of the country have given nearly 1,000 consultations (170 of them prenatal). The organization’s staff have delivered over a dozen babies.