Philippines: Life after Typhoon Haiyan

Survivors have shown remarkable resilience, but six months after Haiyan, millions remain in a precarious situation. With ICRC support, people in hard-hit Eastern Samar are moving towards self-sufficiency.
Click a photo to hear a story:

  • Floro and his family now depend on handouts after the typhoon destroyed his fishing boat. But not for long.

  • When the typhoon hit, the hospital where Marlon works became a chaotic, makeshift evacuation centre.

  • Typhoon Haiyan nearly destroyed the hospital where Floriza was recovering from giving birth to a baby boy.

  • Lester is hard at work fixing water systems damaged by the disaster.

The world's worst-ever typhoon struck central Philippines on 8 November 2013, making landfall with 300 km winds and 5-metre waves. Communities were left without food, electricity, water or any means of contacting their relatives.

Floro, fisherman

Floro and his family now depend on handouts after the typhoon destroyed his fishing boat. But not for long.

Livelihood support

How we’re helping to rebuild livelihoods:

  • Cash grants have helped over 8,000 people kick-start small businesses, with 150,000 people set to benefit. We've also launched cash-for-work programmes for nearly 4,000 people (we’re aiming to reach 10,000) to carry out essential community work.
  • We’ll help 8,000 fishermen and farmers to rebuild their boats or start tilling the land again. To tide people through the hard times, we've already provided emergency food and essential household items to over 215,000 people.

Marlon, nurse

When the typhoon hit, the hospital where Marlon works became a chaotic, makeshift evacuation centre.

Boosting medical care

How we’re supporting the health system on Samar Island:

  • Our engineers are repairing, re-equipping and re-stocking two district hospitals, six rural health units and six village health stations.
  • We've trained over 100 medical staff and 60 Red Cross volunteers to understand post-disaster mental health and psychosocial problems and to provide basic counselling to survivors.

Floriza, new mother

Typhoon Haiyan nearly destroyed the hospital where Floriza was recovering from giving birth to a baby boy.

Emergency treatment

In the immediate aftermath of the disaster:

  • We treated nearly 8,000 patients in our emergency health facilities and delivered 92 babies.
  • We supplied four hospitals, seven rural health units and 50 village health stations with medical supplies, equipment and drugs so they could continue to treat patients.

Lester, ICRC engineer

Lester is hard at work fixing water systems damaged by the disaster.

Clean water

We’re bringing people clean water:

  • We’ve repaired 65 water systems in nine municipalities along the Samar coast, benefiting 85,000 people.
  • While we were repairing the water infrastructure, we delivered 16 million litres of drinking water every day to 70,000 people along the Samar coast, via emergency water treatment plants and tankers.
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